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Page "History of England" ¶ 49
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Henry's and successor
Henry's designated successor, Otto, was elected King in Aachen in 936.
The uncertainty about what would happen after Henry's death continued to grow ; Richard was keen to join a new crusade and remained concerned that whilst he was away Henry would appoint John his formal successor.
Henry's successor, Richard I, paid relatively little attention to Kenilworth but under King John significant building resumed at the castle.
Stephen announced the Treaty of Winchester in Winchester Cathedral: he recognised Henry FitzEmpress as his adopted son and successor, in return for Henry doing homage to him ; Stephen promised to listen to Henry's advice, but retained all his royal powers ; Stephen's remaining son, William, would do homage to Henry and renounce his claim to the throne, in exchange for promises of the security of his lands ; key royal castles would be held on Henry's behalf by guarantors whilst Stephen would have access to Henry's castles ; and the numerous foreign mercenaries would be demobilised and sent home.
Queen Margaret nevertheless suspected York of wishing to supplant her infant son, Edward, as Henry's successor, and the heirs of the Lancastrian nobles who were killed at St Albans remained at deadly feud with York.
He returned to court a few months before Henry's death and saw his brother Edward become Lord Protector of England and, in effect, ruler of the realm as Regent for his nephew, Henry VIII's minor son and successor, the short-lived Edward VI.
After weeks of negotiation, the best that could be achieved was the Act of Accord, by which York and his heirs were recognised as Henry's successor.
The rebels called for an end to the dissolution of the monasteries, for the removal of Cromwell, and for Henry's daughter, and eldest child, the Catholic Mary to be named as successor in place of his younger son, Edward.
Henry's attempts to install his daughter, the Empress Matilda, as his successor were unsuccessful and on Henry's death in 1135, his nephew Stephen of Blois took power with the help of his brother, Henry of Winchester.
Stephen announced the Treaty of Winchester in Winchester Cathedral: he recognised Henry FitzEmpress as his adopted son and successor, in return for Henry doing homage to him ; Stephen promised to listen to Henry's advice, but retained all his royal powers ; Stephen's remaining son, William, would do homage to Henry and renounce his claim to the throne, in exchange for promises of the security of his lands ; key royal castles would be held on Henry's behalf by guarantors whilst Stephen would have access to Henry's castles ; and the numerous foreign mercenaries would be demobilised and sent home.
Its successor is Prince Henry's Grammar School, Otley in Farnley Lane.
In 939 Henry's son and successor, Otto I, invaded Lotharingia and defeated Gilbert in the Battle of Andernach.
This transfer of loyalties of the oldest brother and head of the whole family, Diego, after Henry's death in December 1474, was duly rewarded by Queen Isabella I of Castile, Queen successor since December 1474 awarding Diego the title of Duke of the Infantado or Duke of l ' Infantado on 22 July 1475.
For a short while, she was a lady-in-waiting to Henry's fourth wife, Anne of Cleves, but due to her own health problems she left the Queen's service around the time the royal marriage was dissolved and did not serve Anne's successor, Catherine Howard.
At the time of Fitzroy's death an Act was going through Parliament which disinherited Henry's daughter Elizabeth as his heir and permitted the King to designate his successor, whether legitimate or not.
This changed only under Henry's successor, his daughter, Queen Mary
In 1292 internal conflict arose about the question of Henry's successor.
After Henry's death, Eberhard soon came into conflict with Henry's son and successor, Emperor Otto I.

Henry's and Richard
He allied himself with the Duke of Aquitaine and son of Henry IIRichard Lionheart — and together they launched a decisive attack on Henry's castle and home of Chinon and removed him from power.
Philip initially allied with Henry's young sons, Richard the Lionheart and John Lackland, who were in rebellion against their father.
Philip befriended all of Henry's sons and used them to foment rebellion against their father, but turned against both Richard and John after their respective accessions to the throne.
Accounts note that Richard fought bravely and ably during this manoeuvre, unhorsing Sir John Cheney, a well-known jousting champion, killing Henry's standard bearer Sir William Brandon and coming within a sword's length of Henry himself before being finally surrounded by Sir William Stanley's men and killed.
On 4 July 1189, Richard and Philip's forces defeated Henry's army at Ballans.
Roger of Hoveden claimed that Henry's corpse bled from the nose in Richard's presence, which was taken as a sign that Richard had caused his death.
Following Henry's death Rhys revolted against Richard I and attacked the Norman lordships surrounding his territory, capturing a number of castles.
* King Richard II of England exiles his cousin Henry Bolingbroke ( the future Henry IV of England ) for 10 years in order to end Henry's feud with Thomas de Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk, who is also exiled.
* Duke of York – Henry's cousin ; he is the Duke of Aumerle of Richard II, and the traitor Cambridge's brother ; nothing is made of these connections.
Upon the exile of Henry's father in 1398, Richard II took the boy into his own charge and treated him kindly.
In 1399, both Henry's grandfather and King Richard II died, bringing the Lancastrian usurpation that brought Henry's father to the throne, and Henry was recalled from Ireland into prominence as heir to the Kingdom of England.
Among his childhood friends was his cousin Henry of Almain, son of King Henry's brother Richard of Cornwall.
From 1428, Henry's tutor was Richard de Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, whose father had been instrumental in the opposition to Richard II's reign.
His father, John of Gaunt, was the third son of Edward III, and enjoyed a position of considerable influence during much of the reign of Henry's cousin Richard II, whom Henry eventually deposed.
Yet before the duel could take place, Richard II decided to banish Henry from the kingdom ( with the approval of Henry's father, John of Gaunt ) to avoid further bloodshed.
Henry's first major problem as monarch was what to do with the deposed Richard.
" The old fable of a living Richard was revived ", notes one account, " and emissaries from Scotland traversed the villages of England, in the last year of Henry's reign, declaring that Richard was residing at the Scottish Court, awaiting only a signal from his friends to repair to London and recover his throne.
Some medieval writers felt that he was struck with leprosy as a punishment for his treatment of Richard le Scrope, Archbishop of York, who was executed in June 1405 on Henry's orders after a failed coup.
Also involved is Philip's half-sister Alais, who has been at court since she was betrothed to Richard at age eight, but has since become Henry's mistress.

Henry's and I
Contenders for the throne of Castile were Henry's one-time heir Joanna La Beltraneja, supported by Portugal and France, and Henry's half-sister Queen Isabella I of Castile, supported by the Kingdom of Aragon and by the Castilian nobility.
The timing of Henry's case was very unfortunate ; it was 1527 and the Pope had been taken prisoner by the emperor Charles V, Catherine's nephew and the most powerful man in Europe, for siding with his archenemy Francis I of France.
When John I died, Henry's eldest brother, Edward became head of the castles council, and granted Henry a " Royal Flush " of all profits from trading within the areas he discovered as well as the sole right to authorize expeditions beyond Cape Bojador.
The next year Henry's ally Władysław III Spindleshanks succeeded Leszek I as High Duke ; however as he was still contested by his nephew in Greater Poland, he made Henry his governor at Kraków, whereby the Silesian duke once again became entangled into the dispute over the Seniorate Province.
Cardinal Wolsey, Henry's chief adviser, then resumed marriage negotiations with the French, and Henry suggested that Mary marry the Dauphin's father, King Francis I himself, who was eager for an alliance with England.
In 929 the city went to Edward the Elder's daughter Edith, through her marriage to Henry's son Otto I, as a Morgengabe — a Germanic customary gift received by the new bride from the groom and his family after the wedding night.
The death of Henry's fourth son, Geoffrey II, Duke of Brittany in 1186 began a new round of disputes, as Henry insisted that he retain the guardianship of the duchy for his unborn grandson Arthur I, Duke of Brittany.
The dukes of Saxony became kings ( Henry I, the Fowler, 919 ) and later the first emperors ( Henry's son, Otto I, the Great ) of Germany during the 10th century, but they lost this position in 1024.
David I of Scotland invaded the north on the news of Henry's death, taking Carlisle, Newcastle and other key strongholds.
* September 21 – Battle of Arques: King Henry's forces defeat the forces of the Catholic League under Charles of Lorraine, Duke of Mayenne ( younger brother of Henry I, Duke of Guise ).
When Henry's revolt failed, Mieszko I swore loyalty to Otto III.
After Henry's death in 1024, Bolesław I took advantage of the interregnum in Germany and crowned himself king in 1025, thus raising Poland to the rank of a kingdom before its neighbor Bohemia.
However, not all the Silesian dukes accepted his authority: Dukes Bolko I the Strict, Konrad II the Hunchback and three of the four sons of Władysław of Opole: Casimir of Bytom, Mieszko I of Cieszyn and Przemysław of Racibórz were completely against Henry's politics.
The conference at Calais was something of a political triumph, but even though the French government gave implicit support for Henry's re-marriage and Francis I himself held private conference with Anne, the French King maintained alliances with the Pope which he could not explicitly defy.
As a result, following Henry's death Spain invaded Portugal and the Spanish king became Philip I of Portugal in 1580.
On Henry's death in 1272 he was succeeded by his son Edward I.
Critical events of Henry's reign are well described, including the dismissal of Peter des Roches ( after a politically loaded riddle by Roger Bacon is answered by Henry ), the ejection of Poitevins from England, the conflict with Hubert de Burgh, the marriage of Eleanor with Simon de Montfort, and finally the accession of Henry's son, Edward I after the battle of Evesham.
One of Henry's elder sisters, Philippa of Lancaster, married John I of Portugal, and his younger sister Elizabeth was the mother of John Holland, 2nd Duke of Exeter.

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