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Page "adventure" ¶ 1065
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She and came
She came down against him, and he tried to break her fall.
She was not an overnight guest in the White House, but Mr. Ike Hoover, the chief usher, had Mama check her fur coat when she came in, and take care of her needs.
She had stood at the bottom of the stairs, as usual, when Mrs. Coolidge came down, in the same dress that is now in the Smithsonian, to greet her guests.
She came back the other day to reassure me.
She came to the ballroom and stood on the two carpeted steps that led down to it.
She had surprised Hans like she had surprised me when she said she'd go, and then she surprised him again when she came back so quick like she must have, because when I came in with the snow she was there with a bottle with three white feathers on its label and Hans was holding it angrily by the throat.
She came to New York from Detroit as a teenager, but with a `` sponsor '' instead of a chaperone.
She discussed in her letters to Winslow some of the questions that came to her as she studied alone.
She thought she was bigger than we are because she came from Torino ''.
She started to move away, just as a woman came out of the cottage, a big-boned, drab-haired figure with a clean apron tied over her limp print dress.
She came to me one day.
She was almost sick when Bobbie came home with the news that Poor John had won the job.
She came out pink from a hot bath, and I gave her my robe.
She came home on the death of her aunt in early November 1842, while her sisters were in Brussels.
She told everyone that the money came from her father, who died at about the same time.
She came home afterward with the necklace and kept silent as if nothing happened.
She slowly began to turn into a black poplar, the bark spreading up her legs from the earth, but just before the woody stiffness finally reached her throat and as her arms began sprouting twigs her husband Andraemon heard her cries and came to her.
She was interviewed by Diane Anderson-Minshall and came out as a lesbian, although she later recanted.
She pieced it together from the news she heard that the prince's wife Ata-bime came to and took a clump of earth in the corner of her neckerchief.
She briefly develops a psychic shadow form like Psylocke's, with a gold Phoenix emblem over her eye instead of the Crimson Dawn mark possessed by Psylocke, Jean briefly lost her telekinesis to Psylocke during this exchange, but her telekinetic abilities later came back in full at a far stronger level than before.
She first came to public attention after winning a musical competition at age six by playing the piano.
She also came from stage acting and had a girlish / whimsical charm to which audiences responded.
She was a young woman who came to the Ryall's Hotel in Blantyre, where Harold Macmillan was lunching on the homeward leg of his famous ' wind of change ' tour in Cape Town.

She and from
She helped him with the dishes, then he brought more water in from the spring before it got dark.
She was carrying a quirt, and she started to raise it, then let it fall again and dangle from her wrist.
She had to get away from here before this demoniac possession swallowed up the liquid of her eyes and sank into the fibers of her brain, depriving her of reason and sight.
She had to move in some direction -- any direction that would take her away from this evil place.
She yanked away from him furiously.
She sat quietly, staring at me from the wide eyes.
She stood up, pulled the coat from her shoulders and started to slide it off, then let out a high-pitched scream and I let out a low-pitched, wobbling sound like a muffler blowing out.
She had jumped away from his shy touch like a cat confronted by a sidewinder.
She softly let herself into the bed, and took her regular side, away from the door, where she slept better because Keith was between her and the invader.
She was born Lilian Steichen, her parents immigrants from Luxemburg.
She was pious, too, once kneeling through the night from Holy Thursday to Good Friday, despite the protest of the nuns that this was too much for a young girl.
She ended her letter with the assurance that she considered his friendship for her daughter and herself to be an honor, from which she could not part `` without still more pain ''.
She didn't turn away from the window.
She was from Prague.
She was ready to kill the beef, dress it out, and with vegetables from her garden was going to can soup, broth, hash, and stew against the winter.
She said, `` I notice the girl from across the street hasn't bothered to phone or visit ''.
She smoothed the covers on Scotty's bed and picked things up from the floor.
She soared over the new pastor like an avenging angel lest he stray from the path and not know all the truth and gossip of which she was chief repository.
She was told by the manservant who opened the door that his lordship was engaged on work from which he had left strict orders he was not to be disturbed.
She usually wore weeds, and a stranger watching her board a train might have guessed that Mr. Pastern was dead, but Mr. Pastern was far from dead.
She turned and walked stiffly into the parlor to the dainty-legged escritoire, warped and cracked now from fifty years in an atmosphere of sea spray.
She looked at the girl speculatively from eyes which had paled with the years ; ;
She was personally sloppy, and when she had colds would blow her nose in the same handkerchief all day and keep it, soaking wet, dangling from her waist, and when she gardened she would eat dinner with dirt on her calves.

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