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Page "adventure" ¶ 1364
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She and looked
She had reached a point at which she didn't even care how she looked.
She looked around.
She looked at him, lips compressed.
She looked more like twenty-five or six.
She set the dipper on the edge of the deck, leaving it for him to stretch after it while she looked on scornfully.
She looked up and saw that, without knowing it, Mrs. Coolidge was holding it aloft.
She looked at him in surprise.
She looked back toward the schoolroom.
She looked at the girl speculatively from eyes which had paled with the years ; ;
She felt the look and looked back because she could not help it, seeing that he was neither as old nor as thick as she had at first believed.
She looked mighty interested, though.
She looked at him impudently over the corner of the paper.
She it was who had looked to see if I was wearing shoes upon learning that I couldn't drive.
She looked confused at this, and I felt sure it had been a wrong response for me to make.
She must have looked temptingly pretty to the dean as he put the crown on her head.
She looked at me provocatively.
She looked around, self-consciously.
She certainly looked Japanese, and perhaps she could not really blame the young men.
She looked crestfallen, as if he had somehow disappointed the whole human race.
She looked well-fed and prosperous, but he didn't get the impression he was being propositioned the way he'd been hoping.
She looked out at the corn field, the great green deep acres of it rolled out like the sea in the field beyond the whitewashed fence bordering the grounds.
She looked as if she were accusing me of some fraud.
She looked about sixty, though I recalled that the chart gave her age as forty-four.
She looked good, with her short tousled hair and no make-up.

She and down
She sat down at the table, shaking her head.
She brought the quirt down, slashing it across his cheek, and he tried to step back.
She came down against him, and he tried to break her fall.
She set down her suitcase.
She was watching a tree ride wildly down that roiling current.
She would often go up on the roof to see the attendant take down the flag in the evening.
She had stood at the bottom of the stairs, as usual, when Mrs. Coolidge came down, in the same dress that is now in the Smithsonian, to greet her guests.
She had to clean the glass on the display cases in the butcher shop, help her brother scrub the cutting tables with wire brushes, mop the floors, put down new sawdust on the floors and help check the outgoing orders.
She had the hips of a boy and a loose-jointed walk that reminded me of a string of beads strolling down the street.
She remembered McClellan's last proclamation as she hurried fearfully down the stairs.
She came to the ballroom and stood on the two carpeted steps that led down to it.
She did this now, comfortably aware of the mist running down the windows, of the silence outside, of the dark afternoon it was getting to be.
She stood up, smoothing her hair down, straightening her clothes, feeling a thankfulness for the enveloping darkness outside, and, above everything else, for the absence of the need to answer, to respond, to be aware even of Stowey coming in or going out, and yet, now that she was beginning to cook, she glimpsed a future without him, a future alone like this, and the pain made her head writhe, and in a moment she found it hard to wait for Lucretia to come with her guests.
She made General Burnside's horse's belly do so funny when it was upside down.
She smoothed the skirt, sat down, then stood up and went back to the windows.
She sat down on the nearest, fallen with age and gray with sea-damp, her fingers tracing the indecipherable carved letters padded with green moss.
She stood indecisively for a moment, then walked down the hall ; ;
She sat down and played two slots at once, looking grim, as if bested by mechanical devices, and Owen felt sorry for the lay-sisters depending on her support.
She was eating bread and cheese just as fast as she possibly could, and washing it down with red wine.
She saw me and sat down beside me, three feet away.
She likens Inanna to a great storm bird who swoops down on the lesser gods and sends them fluttering off like surprised bats.
She has referenced this independence from major labels in song more than once, including " The Million You Never Made " ( Not A Pretty Girl ), which discusses the act of turning down a lucrative contract, " The Next Big Thing " ( Not So Soft ), which describes an imagined meeting with a label head-hunter who evaluates the singer based on her looks, and " Napoleon " ( Dilate ), which sympathizes sarcastically with an unnamed friend who did sign with a label.
She ends up hitting every batter at the plate ( or " beaning " them ) and goes down as the worst pitcher in history.
She asks Deckard to hunt down the " missing " sixth replicant.

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