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Page "adventure" ¶ 1279
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She and said
She stared at him, her eyes wide as she thought about what he had said ; ;
She said, `` I guess the Lord looks out for fools, drunkards, and innocents ''.
She said, and her tone had softened until it was almost friendly.
`` She won't change her mind '', Brannon said.
She was still hugging the stained coat around her, so I said, `` Relax, let me take your things.
She said incredulously.
She said without turning her head, `` After that rain beating in atop the dust, there isn't a thing that won't be streaked ''.
She said, `` My name is Songau and these girls are Ponkob and Piwen.
She said, her voice rising.
She said, with the solicitude of a middle-aged woman for her only child.
She daubed at her swimming eyes with a lacy handkerchief and said with obvious emotion: `` That poor boy!!
She regretted what she described as the `` unwarrantable & unnecessary '' check to their friendship and said that she felt that they understood one another perfectly.
She had, she said, heard that the plant was closing.
She said.
She said, `` I notice the girl from across the street hasn't bothered to phone or visit ''.
She said, `` Do you think you'll miss school ''??
She said, `` My dear, do you know what Kent House is ''??
She never said a word about the fifty dollars.
She would have said triumph.
`` She didn't mention bringing Myra '', Mark said, maneuvering the car into the next lane.
She had surprised Hans like she had surprised me when she said she'd go, and then she surprised him again when she came back so quick like she must have, because when I came in with the snow she was there with a bottle with three white feathers on its label and Hans was holding it angrily by the throat.
She said to the saleslady, `` I want a dress to put on around the house ''.
She said it was after she returned from her vomiting spell in the back yard that Mrs. Borden told her to wash the windows.
She told police about the prospective tenant she had heard quarreling with her father some weeks before the murders, but she said she thought he was from out of town because she heard him mention something about talking to his partner.

She and with
She helped him with the dishes, then he brought more water in from the spring before it got dark.
She wiped it off with the sleeve of her coat.
She remembered little of her previous journey there with Grace, and she could but hope that her dedication to her mission would enable her to accomplish it.
She regarded them as signs that she was nearing the glen she sought, and she was glad to at last be doing something positive in her unenunciated, undefined struggle with the mountain and its darkling inhabitants.
She was standing with her back to the glass door.
She raised a protesting hand with a startled air.
She had touched her face, truly a noble and pure face, only with a lip salve which made her lips glisten but no redder than usual.
She cackled with mirth, showing the stumps of betel-stained teeth.
She had driven up with her husband in a convertible with Eastern license plates, although the two drivers knew nothing at the moment about that.
She would look at Jack, with that hidden something in her eyes, and Jack would see the Woman and become breathless and a little sick.
She munched little ginger cakes called mulatto's belly and kept her green, somewhat hypnotic eyes fixed on a light-colored male who was prancing wildly with a 5-foot king snake wrapped around his bronze neck.
She, too, is concerned with `` the becoming, the process of realization '', but she does not think in terms of subtle variations of spatial or temporal patterns.
She has rarely been photographed with him and, except for Carl's seventy-fifth anniversary celebration in Chicago in 1953, she has not attended the dozens of banquets, functions, public appearances, and dinners honoring him -- all of this upon her insistence.
She opened the boxes with a tear in her eye and a sad smile on her face.
She ended her letter with the assurance that she considered his friendship for her daughter and herself to be an honor, from which she could not part `` without still more pain ''.
She was Ellen Aldridge, a widow of good repute who was employed by Gorton's wife and lived with the family.
She had to clean the glass on the display cases in the butcher shop, help her brother scrub the cutting tables with wire brushes, mop the floors, put down new sawdust on the floors and help check the outgoing orders.
She had been picked up by the Russians, questioned in connection with some pamphlets, sentenced to life imprisonment for espionage.
She gave me the names of some people who would surely help pay for the flowers and might even march up to the monument with me.
She had, with her own work-weary hands, put seeds in the ground, watched them sprout, bud, blossom, and get ready to bear.

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