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Page "Ann Widdecombe" ¶ 2
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She and then
She rubbed her eyes and stretched, then sat up, her hands going to her hair.
She helped him with the dishes, then he brought more water in from the spring before it got dark.
She was carrying a quirt, and she started to raise it, then let it fall again and dangle from her wrist.
She saw it then, the distant derrick of the wildcat -- a test well in unexplored country.
She stood up, pulled the coat from her shoulders and started to slide it off, then let out a high-pitched scream and I let out a low-pitched, wobbling sound like a muffler blowing out.
`` She didn't really say '' -- She glanced away at the floor, then swooped gracefully and picked up one of Scotty's slippers.
She just about made me carry her upstairs and then she clung to me and wouldn't let me go.
She had surprised Hans like she had surprised me when she said she'd go, and then she surprised him again when she came back so quick like she must have, because when I came in with the snow she was there with a bottle with three white feathers on its label and Hans was holding it angrily by the throat.
She went into the living room and turned on three lamps, then back into the kitchen where she turned on the ceiling light and the switch that lit the floods on the barn, illuminating the driveway.
She then went over them thoroughly giving each a strenuous test in showmanship.
She was then trained on the trot until December 29, hitched to a breaking cart once around the half-mile track and hoppled again.
She patronized Greenwich Village artists for awhile, then put some money into a Broadway show which was successful ( terrible, but successful ).
She then described her experience as one in which she first had difficulty accepting for herself a state of being in which she relinquished control.
She retreated by leaving the room when we suggested that our meeting might well terminate right then and there.
She was the John Harvey, one of those Atlantic sea-horses that had sailed to Bari to bring beans, bombs, and bullets to the U.S. Fifteenth Air Force, to Field Marshal Montgomery's Eighth Army then racing up the calf of the boot of Italy in that early December of 1943.
She was Mary Lou Brew then, wide-eyed, but not naive.
She worked as a domestic, first in Newport for a year, and then in South Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, for another year.
She had assumed before then that one day he would ask her to marry him.
She was thirty-one years old then.
She walked restlessly across the room, then back to the windows.
She smoothed the skirt, sat down, then stood up and went back to the windows.
She made a face at him and then she laughed.
She threw back a cushion over one of the seats, unlocked a padlock on the chest beneath it, then presently straightened, holding a long knife and a wicked looking spear gun in her hand.
She took postgraduate work at the University of Grenoble in France and then returned to London to work on market research with an advertising firm.

She and read
She knelt out of reverence for having read the Meditations of St. Augustine.
She read everything else she could get her hands on, including an article ( she thinks it was in the Atlantic Monthly ) by Mark Twain on `` White Slavery ''.
She read Maitland's Dark Ages, `` which I enjoyed very much '' ; ;
She made better pictures than any book he'd read, but he didn't say so.
She would not stop to read them in American Express, as many were doing, sitting on benches or leaning against the walls, but pushed her way out into the street.
She bound Andrew as a boy as an apprentice tailor ; Johnson had no formal education but taught himself how to read and write, with some help from his masters, as was their obligation under his apprenticeship.
She sent her students a definition of the Trinity ( circa 1898 ), which read in part: " Jesus in the flesh was the prophet or wayshower to Life, Truth, and Love, and out of the flesh Jesus was the Christ, the spiritual idea, or image and likeness of God.
She learned to speak, read and write in Spanish and Latin, and spoke French and Greek.
She read avidly and took long walks amongst a natural environment that inspired her greatly.
She read books, wrote letters, and played the lute ( see Bartolomeo Tromboncino ).
She studied at St Paul's Girls ' School, read history at Somerville College, Oxford, England, and became the first female president of the Oxford University Archaeological Society.
She later explained: " When I read it, I was 15 and I don't think I was mature enough to understand the script's material.
She raised money for public libraries through her establishment of the Texas Book Festival, and established the First Lady's Family Literacy Initiative, which encouraged families to read together.
She also read the plays of William Shakespeare, and novels by Charles Dickens and Sir Walter Scott.
She preferred that parents or teachers read aloud those texts ( such as Plutarch and the Old Testament ), making omissions only where necessary.
She signed on to Scream 2 without having read the script, on the basis of the success of the first film.
She read widely, did fine needle work and was an amateur musician.
She read a free verse poem calling for peace in the world.
She was able to attend a Congregationalist Sunday school where she learned to read and write.
She could read and write a little, but was much better at needlework and household management, which were considered much more necessary for women.
She could read and write, but only in German.
She read excerpts from Ulalume by Edgar Allan Poe.
She read the Odyssey at the age of nine and enjoyed the works of John Bunyan, especially his 1678 story The Pilgrim's Progress.

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