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common and law
John Adams asserted in the Continental Congress' Declaration of Rights that the demands of the colonies were in accordance with their charters, the British Constitution and the common law, and Jefferson appealed in the Declaration of Independence `` to the tribunal of the world '' for support of a revolution justified by `` the laws of nature and of nature's God ''.
It seemed to me that the liberals had scrapped the balanced polarity and reposed both liberty and the fundamental law in the common man.
Living pictures of the early boroughs, country life in Tudor and Stuart times, the impact of the industrial revolution compete with sensitive surveys of language and literature, the common law, parliamentary development.
To obey the moral law is just ordinary common sense, applied to a neglected field.
The theory of international law, which in the nineteenth century became common to virtually all writers in Europe and America, broke this unity and this universality.
The Lincoln Mills decision authorizes a whole new body of federal `` common law '' which, as Mr. Justice Frankfurter pointed out in dissent, leads to one of the following `` incongruities '': `` ( ( 1 ) conflict in federal and state court interpretations of collective bargaining agreements ; ;
He is a trustee for the common good, however feeble the safeguards which the positive or municipal law of property provides against his misuse of that share of the common fund, wisely or unwisely, entrusted to his keeping.
Eighteenth-century England, upon whose customs our common law was built, had outlawed unions as monopolies and conspiracies.
In Anglo-American common law courts, appellate review of lower court decisions may also be obtained by filing a petition for review by prerogative writ in certain cases.
In the common law, an answer is the first pleading by a defendant, usually filed and served upon the plaintiff within a certain strict time limit after a civil complaint or criminal information or indictment has been served upon the defendant.
In the context of patent law and specifically in prior art searches, searching through abstracts is a common way to find relevant prior art document to question to novelty or inventive step ( or non-obviousness in United States patent law ) of an invention.
The term " allocution " is generally only in use in jurisdictions in the United States, though there are vaguely similar processes in other common law countries.
At common law allegiance is a true and faithful obedience of the subject due to his Sovereign.
By ancient common law it might be required of all persons above the age of 12, and it was repeatedly used as a test for the disaffected.
* Abatement of debts and legacies, a common law doctrine of wills
Jurisprudence is based on English common law.
Assault in some US jurisdictions is defined more broadly still as any intentional physical contact with another person without their consent ; but in the majority of the United States, and in England and Wales and all other common law jurisdictions in the world, this is defined instead as battery.
In common law, criminal assault often accompanied battery.
In English law, s58 Children Act 2004, limits the availability of the lawful correction defense to common assault under s39 Criminal Justice Act 1988.
Assault is a common law crime defined as " unlawfully and intentionally applying force to the person of another, or inspiring a belief in that other that force is immediately to be applied to him.
" The common law crime of indecent assault was repealed by the Criminal Law ( Sexual Offences and Related Matters ) Amendment Act, 2007, and replaced by a statutory crime of sexual assault.
English law provides for two offences of assault: common assault and battery.
American common law has defined assault as an attempt to commit a battery.

common and constitutes
For example, in Virginia, the definition of the conduct that constitutes the crime of robbery exists only in the common law, and the robbery statute only sets the punishment.
The model of the nation state implies that its population constitutes a nation, united by a common descent, a common language and many forms of shared culture.
Outing gives rise to issues of privacy, choice, hypocrisy, and harm in addition to sparking debate on what constitutes common good in efforts to combat homophobia and heterosexism.
In essence, a system constitutes a set of interrelated components working together with a common objective: fulfilling some designated need.
In philately, the watermark is a key feature of a stamp, and often constitutes the difference between a common and a rare stamp.
This does not mean that there is no common ground among taxonomists in what constitutes a " good " genus.
A common concern since the early part of the 20th century is the question of what constitutes art.
: The opening of the superficial vessels for the purpose of extracting blood constitutes one of the most common operations of the practitioner.
because the first one is that of logic … and as I cannot object to the premise " that all people have the right to eat ", I must defer to all the conclusions …. The second of the two compelling voices, of which I am talking, is even more powerful than the first, because it is the voice of hatred, the hatred I dedicate to this common enemy that constitutes the most distinctive contrast to communism and that will oppose the angry giant already at the first instance – I am talking about the party of the so-called advocates of nationality in Germany, about those false patriots whose love for the fatherland only exists in the shape of imbecile distaste of foreign countries and neighbouring peoples and who daily pour their bile especially on France ".
Pufendorf powerfully defends the idea that international law is not restricted to Christendom, but constitutes a common bond between all nations because all nations form part of humanity.
Josiah Royce ( 1855 – 1916 ) built on the transcendental idealism view of conscience, viewing it as the ideal of life which constitutes our moral personality, our plan of being ourself, of making common sense ethical decisions.
A maritime lien constitutes a security interest upon ships of a nature otherwise unknown to the common law or equity.
The common measures of what constitutes middle class vary significantly between cultures.
Multiple myeloma is the second most common hematological malignancy in the U. S. ( after non-Hodgkin lymphoma ), and constitutes 1 % of all cancers.
While nearly everyone claims that aiding the common well-being or general welfare is positive, there is little, if any, consensus on what exactly constitutes the public interest, or whether the concept itself is a coherent one.
People have wildly different opinions about what constitutes a proper computer party ; the common trend at TG these years seem to be warez, games ( the most popular being Counter-Strike ), and IRC.
It only constitutes a tiny section of the Rostra as a whole, but may well have given name to the entire structure at that time and not just that specific section as was common after restorations.
" Our " present understanding of the law of discrimination ", Robertson argued, precludes the conclusion that " the common law limitations of marriage to persons of the opposite sex " constitutes discrimination under Section 15 of the Charter.
This makes GIST the most common form of sarcoma, which constitutes more than 70 types of cancer, but in all forms constitutes less than 1 % of all cancer.
The rules governing what constitutes homesteading were not specified by common law but by the local statutory law.
Thus even where no phrase in local language which exactly translates " oral literature " is used, what constitutes " oral literature " as understood today is already understood to be part or all of the lore media with which a society conducts profound and common cultural affairs among its members, orally.
A set of folds distributed on a regional scale constitutes a fold belt, a common feature of orogenic zones.

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