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nickname and ",
In his early years he played with the camel foals and goats, and his love for camels earned him the nickname " Abu Bakr ", the father of the foal of the camel.
The author opens with a prologue, usually taken to be addressed to an individual by the name of Theophilus ( though this name, which translates literally as " God-lover ", may be a nickname rather than a personal appellation ) and references " my earlier book "— almost certainly the Gospel of Luke.
" Opponents sometimes referred to him as " Slick Willie ", a nickname first applied while he was governor of Arkansas and lasting throughout his presidency.
The poem was originally published anonymously ( under the pen name " Phin ", based on Thayer's college nickname, " Phineas ").
*" Cadillac ", nickname of NFL player Carnell Williams of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers
This style of drive had the popular nickname " Toaster Drive ", because it required the use of a knife or other thin object to pry out the stuck media just like a piece of toast stuck in a real toaster ( though this is inadvisable with real toasters ).
Reporters later shortened the name to " Cy ", which became the nickname Young used for the rest of his life.
The young Gaius earned the nickname Caligula ( meaning " little soldier's boot ", the diminutive form of caliga, n. hob-nailed military boot ) from his father's soldiers while accompanying him during his campaigns in Germania.
Partick Thistle are known as the " Harry Rags ", which is taken from the rhyming slang of their ' official ' nickname " the jags ".
Her nickname appears as a store name in the story " Christmas in Duckburg ", featured on page 1 of Walt Disney ’ s Christmas Parade # 9, published in 1958.
* " The Cobblers ", a nickname for Northampton Town F. C., English association football club
*" The Commodore ", the nickname of American entrepreneur Cornelius Vanderbilt ( 1794 – 1877 )
In the 1987 season, Earnhardt earned his nickname " The Intimidator " after spinning out Elliott in the final segment of " The Winston ", a non-points event now known as the NASCAR Sprint All-Star Race.
During this season Earnhardt garnered a second nickname, " The Man in Black ", owing to the black paint scheme in which the No. 3 car was painted.
All of the boys were called " Ike ", such as " Big Ike " ( Edgar ) and " Little Ike " ( Dwight ); the nickname was intended as an abbreviation of their last name.
where she prefers to be known as Clara Kappelhoff, combining an old nickname (" Clara ", by friend Billy de Wolfe ) and her family name at birth.
) Thomas named the restaurant after his eight-year-old daughter Melinda Lou, whose nickname was " Wenda ", stemming from the child's inability to say her own name at a young age.
The story of Æthelred's notorious nickname, " Æthelred the Unready ", from Old English Æþelræd Unræd, goes a long way toward explaining how his reputation has declined through history.
His nickname Unræd is usually translated into present-day English as " The Unready ", though, because the present-day meaning of " unready " no longer resembles its ancient counterpart, this translation disguises the meaning of the Old English term.
The nickname has alternatively been taken adjectivally as " ill-advised ", " ill-prepared ", " indecisive ", thus " Æthelred the ill-advised ".
Young Louis's nickname among family and friends was " Dickie ", notable in that " Richard " was not among his given names.
This was because his great-grandmother, Queen Victoria, suggested the nickname of " Nicky ", however it got mixed up with the many Nickys of the Russian Imperial Family (" Nicky " was particularly used to refer to Nicholas II, the last Tsar ) so they changed it to Dickie.
Strongman René Richter goes by the nickname " Golem ", and a Czech monster truck outfit calls itself the " Golem Team ".

nickname and after
On their 1950 tour of New Zealand and Australia they also adopted the nickname British Lions, first used by British and South African journalists on the 1924 South African tour, after the lion emblem on their ties, the emblem on their jerseys having been dropped in favour of the four-quartered badge with the symbols of the four represented unions.
When the club folded after the 1870 season, Wright was hired by Boston businessman, Ivers Whitney Adams to organize a new team in Boston, and he did, bringing three teammates and the " Red Stockings " nickname along ( Most nicknames were then only nicknames, neither club names nor registered trademarks, so the migration was informal ).
Ennis comedian Mike Nono elaborated the joke in Limerick's Theatre Royal, and the nickname soon took hold, persisting even after the men received full RIC uniforms.
The club was originally called the Chicago White Stockings, after the nickname abandoned by the Cubs, and the name was soon shortened to Chicago White Sox, believed to have been because the paper would shorten it to Sox in the headlines.
The Addicks nickname never went away and was revived by fans after the club lost its Valley home in 1985 and went into exile at Crystal Palace.
He was soon given his nickname Caligula, meaning " little ( soldier's ) boot " in Latin, after the small boots he wore as part of his uniform.
( An exception was Praise-God Barbon, a Baptist merchant after whom the Assembly got its derogatory nickname.
This corner is reportedly named after a local character who had earned the nickname of Tarzan and only wanted to give up his vegetable garden in the dunes if the track's designers named a nearby corner after him.
It took several months after its publication for the poem to make Thayer famous, since he was hardly the boastful type and had signed the June 24 poem with the nickname " Phin " which he had used since his time on the Lampoon.
He picked up the nickname " Andy " at Cornell, where tradition confers that moniker on any male student surnamed White, after Cornell co-founder Andrew Dickson White.
Because the nickname was first recorded in the 1180s, more than 150 years after Æthelred's death, it is doubtful that it carries any implications for how the king was seen by his contemporaries or near contemporaries.
The club's nickname, the " Cats ", was first used in 1923 after a run of losses prompted a local cartoonist to suggest that the club needed a black cat to bring it good luck.
For many years the Geelong Football Club were known as the Pivotonians, after the city's nickname ' The Pivot '.
" During this time, Bogart bought a motor launch, which he named Sluggy, after his nickname for his hot-tempered wife.
Stephen was named after Bogart's character's nickname in To Have and Have Not, making Bogart a father at 49.
This new network was known as " dal's net ", after the nickname used by the administrator of the first IRC server on the network, " dalvenjah ", taken from the dragon " Dalvenjah Foxfire ", in a fantasy novel by Thorarinn Gunnarsson.
It was named after the nickname of the 1938 Duke football team, one of only three NCAA football teams to go the entire season unbeaten, untied, and not scored upon
The Jeannots rapidly adopted the nickname of Magots ( cheese mites ) after their opponents boasted of aiming to crush them like mites.
It was around this time as the musician's popularity increased that he acquired the nickname, " Soul Brother No. 1 ", after failing to win the title " King of Soul " from Solomon Burke during a Chicago gig two years prior.
The brand name Gramophone was not used in the USA after 1901, and the word fell out of use there, though it has survived in its nickname form, Grammy, as the title of the Grammy Awards.
Reichskanzlei Berchtesgaden (" Reich Chancellery Berchtesgaden "), another nickname of the regime ( named after the eponymous town located in the vicinity of Hitler's mountain residence where he spent much of his time in office ) was also banned at the same time, despite the fact that a sub-section of the Chancellery was in fact installed there to serve Hitler's needs.
Lithman's guitar playing technique earned him the nickname Snakefinger, after his frantic playing on the violin during the performance with the Residents at The Boarding House in San Francisco 1971, where his fingers ' speed made them look like snakes in the eyes of the less-musically proficient, but imaginative Residents.

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