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Page "government" ¶ 223
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We and who
We hear equally fervent concern over the belief that we have not enough generalists who can see the over-all picture and combine our national skills and knowledge for useful purposes.
We may further grant to those of her ( Poetry's ) defenders who are lovers of poetry and yet not poets, the permission to speak in prose on her behalf: let them show not only that she is pleasant but also useful to States and to human life, and we will listen in a kindly spirit ; ;
We lived for a while in a movie melodrama with a German cook and her son who turned out to be Nazis.
We cannot truthfully say of anyone who has succeeded in entering deep into his sixties that he was never old.
We can't think of anyone else who would want to separate serious candidates from other candidates, either.
We now have to think not only of our national security but also of the future generations who will suffer from any tests we might undertake.
We also continued to run a series of ads featuring endorsement of Rhode Island by industrialists who had recently established new plants here.
We also worked out logistics for Sunday afternoon swimmers who arrive two hours early with their weekend guests while we are still enjoying an alfresco lunch en famille.
We must build a corps of highly professional teachers of interior design who have had education, experience in the profession and are willing to take on the usual accompaniments of teaching -- minimal income and minimal status among their confreres.
`` We do not have people in our organization termed ' consultants ' or ' fellows ', who are specialists in one particular technical subject.
We stood under a gigantic tree in the rolling country just outside of Moscow looking at silent flowers on the grave of a Russian poet and writer who cherished the love for his country to the point of foregoing the highest international honor.
`` Disaffiliation '', by the way, is the term used by the critic and poet, Lawrence Lipton, who has written several articles on this subject, the first of which, in The Nation, quoted as Epigraph: `` We disaffiliate.
`` We want to find out who knew about it '', Pratt said.
Mrs. Molvar, who kept reiterating her request that they `` please take a stand '', said, `` We must have faith in somebody -- on the local level, and it wouldn't be possible for everyone to rush to a school to get their children ''.
We today are not entitled to excoriate honest men who believed Parker to be downright pernicious and who barred their pulpits against his demand to poison the minds of their congregations.
We have not the leisure, or the patience, or the skill, to comprehend what was working in the mind and heart of a then recent graduate from the Harvard Divinity School who would muster the audacity to contradict his most formidable instructor, the majesterial Andrews Norton, by saying that, while he believed Jesus `` like other religious teachers '', worked miracles, `` I see not how a miracle proves a doctrine ''.
We trust you are not one of the 70,000,000 Americans who do not attend church, but who feel that various forms of recreation are more important than worshipping the God who made our country great.
We know that in the early part of the century many Protestant congregations took positive action against members who transgressed the ethical codes to which the majority subscribed.
We must also remember those who reacted against the dream as a kind of myth -- among them Melville, Hawthorne, and Henry James the elder, all of them out of a Christian background.
We know that no one who is born of God commits sin.

We and are
We are thirsty and hungry ; ;
We are very proud of it ''.
As Madison commented to Jefferson in 1789, `` We are in a wilderness without a single footstep to guide us.
We began by declaring that all men are created equal.
We now practically read it, all men are created equal except Negroes.
We are desperately in the need of such invention, for man is still very much at the mercy of man.
We get some clue from a few remembrances of childhood and from the circumstance that we are probably not much more afraid of people now than man ever was.
We are not now afraid of atomic bombs in the same way that people once feared comets.
We are worried about what people may do with them -- that some crazy fool may `` push the button ''.
We have staved off a war and, since our behavior has involved all these elements, we can only keep adding to our ritual without daring to abandon any part of it, since we have not the slightest notion which parts are effective.
We are forced, in our behavior towards others, to adopt empirically successful patterns in toto because we have such a minimal understanding of their essential elements.
We are already committed to establishing man's supremacy over nature and everywhere on earth, not merely in the limited social-political-economical context we are fond of today.
We are tempted to blame others for our problems rather than look them straight in the face and realize they are of our own making and possible of solution only by ourselves with the help of desperately needed, enlightened, competent leaders.
We are reminded, however, that freedom of thought and discussion, the unfettered exchange of ideas, is basic under our form of government.
We are also struck by the fact that this story of a boy's love for his mother does not offend, while the incestuous love of the man, Paul Morel, sometimes repels.
We have so completely entered the child's fantasy that his illness and his death are the plausible and the necessary conclusion.
We feel uncomfortable at being bossed by a corporation or a union or a television set, but until we have some knowledge about these phenomena and what they are doing to us, we can hardly learn to control them.
We and our friends are, of course, concerned with self-defense.
`` We were requested by the Secretary General, as I understand it, to discuss with you such matters as appear to us to be relevant, and we are not of course either a formal group or a committee in the sense of being guided by any rules or regulations of the Secretariat.
`` We are ready for your next mysterious assignment '', said Mr. Baer to the Hetman.
We are learning how to do these things in some of the vast organized structures of modern society ; ;
We are all, though many of us are snobbish enough to wish to deny it, in far closer sympathy with the art of the music-hall and picture-palace than with Chaucer and Cimabue, or even Shakespeare and Titian.

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