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Most of our information about him is derived from Herodotus ( 2. 161ff ) and can only be imperfectly verified by monumental evidence.
According to the Greek historian, he was of common origins.
A revolt which broke out among native Egyptian soldiers gave him his opportunity to seize the throne.
These troops, returning home from a disastrous military expedition to Cyrene in Libya, suspected that they had been betrayed in order that Apries, the reigning king, might rule more absolutely by means of his Greek mercenaries ; many Egyptians fully sympathized with them.
General Amasis, sent to meet them and quell the revolt, was proclaimed king by the rebels instead, and Apries, who had now to rely entirely on his mercenaries, was defeated.
Apries was either taken prisoner in the ensuing conflict at Memphis before being eventually strangled and buried in his ancestral tomb at Sais, or fled to the Babylonians and was killed mounting an invasion of his native homeland in 567 B. C. E.
with the aid of a Babylonian army.
An inscription confirms the struggle between the native Egyptian and the foreign soldiery, and proves that Apries was killed and honourably buried in the third year of Amasis ( c. 567 B. C. E .).
Amasis then married Chedebnitjerbone II, one of the daughters of his predecessor Apries, in order to legitimise his kingship.

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