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Bragi and is
Bragi is shown with a harp and accompanied by his wife Iðunn in this 19th-century painting by Nils Blommér.
Bragi is generally associated with bragr, the Norse word for poetry.
A connection between the name Bragi and English brego ' chieftain ' has been suggested but is generally now discounted.
A connection between Bragi and the bragarfull ' promise cup ' is sometimes suggested, as bragafull, an alternate form of the word, might be translated as ' Bragi's cup '.
That Bragi is Odin's son is clearly mentioned only here and in some versions of a list of the sons of Odin ( see Sons of Odin ).
If Bragi's mother is Frigg, then Frigg is somewhat dismissive of Bragi in the Lokasenna in stanza 27 when Frigg complains that if she had a son in Ægir's hall as brave as Baldr then Loki would have to fight for his life.
In that poem Bragi at first forbids Loki to enter the hall but is overruled by Odin.
The first part of Snorri Sturluson's Skáldskaparmál is a dialogue between Ægir and Bragi about the nature of poetry, particularly skaldic poetry.
Bragi Boddason is discussed below.
Bragi is then mentioned, questioning how Odin knows that it is Eric and why Odin has let such a king die.
In the poem Hákonarmál, Hákon the Good is taken to Valhalla by the valkyrie Göndul and Odin sends Hermóðr and Bragi to greet him.
Bragi son of Hálfdan the Old is mentioned only in the Skjáldskaparmál.
This Bragi is the sixth of the second of two groups of nine sons fathered by King Hálfdan the Old on Alvig the Wise, daughter of King Eymund of Hólmgard.
Bragi, from whom the Bragnings are sprung ( that is the race of Hálfdan the Generous ).
is: Bragi ( norræn goðafræði )
In chapter 50, a section of Ragnarsdrápa by the 9th century skald Bragi Boddason is quoted that refers to Hel, the being, as " the monstrous wolf's sister.
The skaldic god Bragi is the first to respond to Loki by telling him that Loki will not have a seat and place assigned to him by the gods at the feast, for the gods know what men they should invite.
Loki replies that Bragi is brave when seated, calling him a " bench-ornament ," and that Bragi would run away when troubled by an angry, spirited man.
In the Prose Edda book Skáldskaparmál, a scenario describing an encounter between an unnamed troll woman and the 9th century skald Bragi Boddason is provided.
A quote from a work by the 9th century skald Bragi Boddason is presented that confirms the description.

Bragi and skaldic
This Bragi was reckoned as the first skaldic poet, and was certainly the earliest skaldic poet then remembered by name whose verse survived in memory.
Further in Skáldskaparmál, the skaldic god Bragi recounds the death of Skaði's father Þjazi by the Æsir.
At a point in dialogue between the skaldic god Bragi and Ægir, Snorri himself begins speaking of the myths in euhemeristic terms and states that the historical equivalent of Víðarr was the Trojan hero Aeneas who survived the Trojan War and went on to achieve " great deeds ".
The history of Norwegian literature starts with the pagan Eddaic poems and skaldic verse of the 9th and 10th centuries with poets such as Bragi Boddason and Eyvindr Skáldaspillir.
In the 9th century the first instances of skaldic poetry also appear with the skalds Bragi Boddason, Þjóðólfr of Hvinir and the court poets of Harald Fairhair.
Skáldskaparmál ( Old Icelandic " the language of poetry ") is the third section of the Prose Edda, and consists of a dialogue between Ægir, a god associated with the sea, and Bragi, a skaldic god, in which both Nordic mythology and discourse on the nature of poetry are intertwined.
In the skaldic poem Hákonarmál ( stanza 14 ) Hermóðr and Bragi appear in Valhalla receiving Hákon the Good.
In both sources, she is described as the wife of the skaldic god Bragi, and in the Prose Edda, also as a keeper of apples and granter of eternal youthfulness.
In chapter 57 of the book, Ægir asks the skaldic god Bragi where the craft of poetry originates.
The same may not be true for Bragi if Bragi is taken to be the skaldic poet Bragi Boddason made into a god.
This Bragi was reckoned as the first skaldic poet, and was certainly the earliest skaldic poet then remembered by name whose verse survived in memory.

Bragi and god
The name of the god may have been derived from bragr, or the term bragr may have been formed to describe ' what Bragi does '.
Snorri Sturluson clearly distinguishes the god Bragi from the mortal skald Bragi Boddason whom he often mentions separately.
Whether Bragi the god originally arose as a deified version of Bragi Boddason was much debated in the 19th century, especially by the German scholars Eugen Mogk and Sophus Bugge.
In these poems Bragi could be either a god or a dead hero in Valhalla.
The Prose Edda consists of a Prologue and three separate books: Gylfaginning, concerning the creation and foretold destruction and rebirth of the Norse mythical world, Skáldskaparmál, a dialogue between Ægir, a supernatural figure connected with the sea, and Bragi, a god connected with skaldship, and Háttatal, a demonstration of verse forms used in Norse mythology.
The god Bragi asks where a thundering sound is coming from, and says that the benches of Valhalla are creaking — as if the god Baldr had returned to Valhalla — and that it sounds like the movement of a thousand.
In chapter 57 of Skáldskaparmál, the god Bragi explains the origin of poetry.
The god Bragi asks where a thundering sound is coming from, and says that the benches of Valhalla are creaking — as if the god Baldr had returned to Valhalla — and that it sounds like the movement of a thousand.
* Another name for Norse god Bragi
The god Bragi asks where a thundering sound is coming from, and says that the benches of Valhalla are creaking — as if the god Baldr had returned to Valhalla — and that it sounds like the movement of a thousand.
It is not certain that either Hermóðr or Bragi is intended to be a god in this poem.
Bragi then tells how the Mead of Poetry, by way of the god Odin, ultimately came into the hands of mankind.

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