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Page "Gabrielle Roy" ¶ 3
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Her and first
Her temper sparked like charcoal when it first lights up.
Her first day at work she was puzzled by an entry in the doctor's notes on an emergency case.
Her first class wasn't until ten, but she always got up to have breakfast with me.
Her first actual flight, for she and her kind had made mock flights on dummy panels since she was eight, showed her complete mastery of the techniques of her profession.
Her first appearance was in a short story published in The Sketch magazine in 1926, " The Tuesday Night Club ", which later became the first chapter of The Thirteen Problems ( 1932 ).
Her first appearance in a full-length novel was in The Murder at the Vicarage in 1930.
Her mother ’ s marriage to Agrippa was her second marriage, as Julia the Elder was widowed from her first marriage, to her paternal cousin Marcus Claudius Marcellus and they had no children.
Her reputed last words, uttered as the assassin was about to strike, were " Smite my womb ", the implication here being she wished to be destroyed first in that part of her body that had given birth to so " abominable a son.
Her second and last novel, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, which is considered to be one of the first sustained feminist novels, appeared in 1848.
Her first marriage, at the age of fifteen, was to the son of her father's rival in Italy, Lothair II, the nominal King of Italy ; the union was part of a political settlement designed to conclude a peace between her father and Hugh of Provence, the father of Lothair.
Her goal was to become the first Christian singer-songwriter who was also successful as a contemporary pop singer.
Her father's grandfather had fled France during the Revolution, going first to Saint-Domingue, then New Orleans, and finally to Cuba where he helped build that country's first railway.
Her first published work was a critical evaluation of D. H. Lawrence called D. H. Lawrence: An Unprofessional Study, which she wrote in sixteen days.
Her work was selected for exhibition in six subsequent Salons until, in 1874, she joined the " rejected " Impressionists in the first of their own exhibitions, which included Paul Cézanne, Edgar Degas, Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, and Alfred Sisley.
Her first school was located in a 17th-century house.
Her first act surprises Odrade greatly.
Her mother, Kay Calista, reversed her own first and middle names in naming her Calista Kay.
Her report, Work Accidents and the Law ( 1910 ), became a classic and resulted in the first workers ' compensation law, which she drafted while serving on a New York state commission.
Her first stories appeared in pulp magazines in the 1930s, including two significant series in Weird Tales.
Her first name, Drew, was the maiden name of her paternal great-grandmother, Georgie Drew Barrymore ; her middle name, Blyth, was the original surname of the dynasty founded by her great-grandfather, Maurice Barrymore.
Her recording of " Sentimental Journey " was the first song placed in the Grammy Hall of Fame.
Her first country single, " Dumb Blonde " ( one of the few songs during this era, that she recorded but did not write ), reached number twenty-four on the country music charts in 1967, followed the same year with Something Fishy, which went to number seventeen.
Her first entirely self-produced effort, 1977's New Harvest ... First Gathering, highlighted Parton's pop sensibilities, both in terms of choice of songs-the album contained covers of the pop and R & B classics " My Girl " and " Higher and Higher " – and the album's production.

Her and novel
Her award-winning 1974 novel The Dispossessed, a book in the Hainish Cycle, tells of the invention of the ansible.
Her 1872 work, Middlemarch, has been described as the greatest novel in the English language by Martin Amis and by Julian Barnes.
Her first complete novel, published in 1859, was Adam Bede and was an instant success, but it prompted an intense interest in who this new author might be.
Her last novel was Daniel Deronda, published in 1876, whereafter she and Lewes moved to Witley, Surrey ; but by this time Lewes's health was failing and he died two years later on 30 November 1878.
Her latest and third adult novel Summer Sisters ( 1998 ) was widely praised and has sold more than 3 million copies.
Her subsequent novel The Dispossessed made her the first person to win both the Hugo and Nebula Awards for Best Novel twice for the same two books.
Her novel The Farthest Shore won the 1973 National Book Award in category Children's Books.
Her 1971 novel The Lathe of Heaven has been adapted twice: first in 1980 by thirteen / WNET New York, with her own participation, and again in 2002 by the A & E Network.
* Pervical Everett, For Her Dark Skin ( novel, 1990 )
Her most famous novel was Madame de ..., published in 1951, which was adapted into the celebrated film The Earrings of Madame de ... ( 1953 ), directed by Max Ophüls and starring Charles Boyer, Danielle Darrieux and Vittorio de Sica.
Her novel Quartet in Autumn ( 1977 ) was nominated for the Booker Prize that year, and she was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.
Her comeback novel, Quartet in Autumn ( 1977 ), was shortlisted for the Booker Prize, and her work found new audiences in the United States.
Her next role would significantly reinforce her position as a bona fide international movie star, The English Patient, based on the prize winning novel by Michael Ondaatje and directed by Anthony Minghella, was a worldwide hit.
Her first novel, Les variations Goldberg ( 1981 ), was awarded the Prix Contrepoint and was shortlisted for the Prix Femina.
Her latest novel is Infrarouge ( 2010 ).
* A race of vampire-like creatures in the Tim Powers novel The Stress of Her Regard
Her last novel, Unless ( 2002 ), was nominated for the 2002 Giller Prize, the Governor General's Award, the Booker Prize and the 2003 Orange Prize for Fiction.
Her last novel, Unless, contains a passionate defense of female writers who write of ' domestic ' subjects.
Her first novel, Seven Poor Men of Sydney ( 1934 ) dealt with the lives of radicals and dockworkers, but she was not a practitioner of social realism.
Stead's Letty Fox: Her Luck, often regarded as an equally fine novel, was officially banned in Australia for several years because it was considered amoral and salacious.
Her novel La plaça del diamant (' The diamond square ', translated as ' The Time of the Doves ', 1962 ) has become the most acclaimed Catalan novel of all time and since the year it was published for the first time, it has been translated into over 20 languages.

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