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Page "Law of the Republic of Ireland" ¶ 24
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has and however
Historically, however, the concept is one that has been of marked benefit to the people of the Western civilizational group.
It is interesting, however, that despite this strong upsurge in Southern writing, almost none of the writers has forsaken the firmly entrenched concept of the white-suited big-daddy colonel sipping a mint julep as he silently recounts the revenue from the season's cotton and tobacco crops ; ;
The traditional strategy of the South has been to expose the vices of the North, to demonstrate that the North possessed no superior virtue, to `` show the world that '' as James's Christopher Newman said to his adversaries ) `` however bad I may be, you're not quite the people to say it ''.
The importance of Rousseau's twist has not always been clear to us, however.
This, however, cannot be done by a community whose very experience of truth is confused and incoherent: it has no absolute standard, and consequently cannot distinguish the absolute from the contingent.
Within the individual the reaction has been called various names, all, however, pointing to the same basic experience.
It is, however, a disarming disguise, or perhaps a shield, for not only has Mercer proved himself to be one of the few great lyricists over the years, but also one who can function remarkably under pressure.
Nineteenth-century virtues, however, seem somehow to have gone out of fashion and the Bright book has never been particularly popular.
No action has been taken, however, on such major problems as ending the fee system, penal reform, modification of the county unit system and in outright banning of fireworks sales.
The full implementation of these noble words, however, has taken the efforts of five sessions of the Legislature.
Nikita Khrushchev, however, has created yet another problem for himself.
With the resumption of Soviet testing and their intransigence at the Geneva talks, however, the hope that this third choice would prove viable has been shaken.
As it has turned out, however, the excessive enthusiasm in the first instance and the loss of hope in the second were both wrong responses.
Apparently, however, Miller has relied heavily on the anatomy in dogs and cats, and he has been criticized for using pathologic human material in his normal study ( Loosli, '38 ).
It is the classroom teacher, however, who has daily contacts with pupils, and who is in a unique position to put sound psychological principles into practice.
When all has been said, however, the big branch store remains a major break with history in the development of American retailing.
If the distant patron of the suburban branch has been frightened away from downtown by traffic problems, however, the city store can only pressure the politicians to do something about the highways or await the completion of the federal highway program.
Once he has been identified, however, a new melody is used to accompany his narrative, a bleak motif with barren octaves creating a rather ancient effect:
The gallium content, however, has been enhanced five-fold.
Recent work with radiocarbon and deuterated alcohols as solvents, however, has given evidence that metal-hydrido and carbonyl complexes may be readily formed by reaction with alcohol in some of these systems.
This has not, however, prevented publishers from labeling him a `` folk poet '', simply because he is a rural one.
It is still, however, the junior member of the League, if not in years at least in the catching up it has had to do.
It was Porter, however, who produced the very first movie whose name has lived on through the half century of film history that has since ensued.

has and been
Besides I heard her old uncle that stays there has been doin' it ''.
Southern resentment has been over the method of its ending, the invasion, and Reconstruction ; ;
The situation of the South since 1865 has been unique in the western world.
The North should thank its stars that such has been the case ; ;
As it is, they consider that the North is now reaping the fruits of excess egalitarianism, that in spite of its high standard of living the `` American way '' has been proved inferior to the English and Scandinavian ways, although they disapprove of the socialistic features of the latter.
In what has aptly been called a `` constitutional revolution '', the basic nature of government was transformed from one essentially negative in nature ( the `` night-watchman state '' ) to one with affirmative duties to perform.
For lawyers, reflecting perhaps their parochial preferences, there has been a special fascination since then in the role played by the Supreme Court in that transformation -- the manner in which its decisions altered in `` the switch in time that saved nine '', President Roosevelt's ill-starred but in effect victorious `` Court-packing plan '', the imprimatur of judicial approval that was finally placed upon social legislation.
Labor relations have been transformed, income security has become a standardized feature of political platforms, and all the many facets of the American version of the welfare state have become part of the conventional wisdom.
In recent weeks, as a result of a sweeping defense policy reappraisal by the Kennedy Administration, basic United States strategy has been modified -- and large new sums allocated -- to meet the accidental-war danger and to reduce it as quickly as possible.
The malignancy of such a landscape has been beautifully described by the Australian Charles Bean.
There has probably always been a bridge of some sort at the southeastern corner of the city.
Even though in most cases the completion of the definitive editions of their writings is still years off, enough documentation has already been assembled to warrant drawing a new composite profile of the leadership which performed the heroic dual feats of winning American independence and founding a new nation.
Madison once remarked: `` My life has been so much a public one '', a comment which fits the careers of the other six.
Thus we are compelled to face the urbanization of the South -- an urbanization which, despite its dramatic and overwhelming effects upon the Southern culture, has been utterly ignored by the bulk of Southern writers.
But the South is, and has been for the past century, engaged in a wide-sweeping urbanization which, oddly enough, is not reflected in its literature.
An example of the changes which have crept over the Southern region may be seen in the Southern Negro's quest for a position in the white-dominated society, a problem that has been reflected in regional fiction especially since 1865.
In the meantime, while the South has been undergoing this phenomenal modernization that is so disappointing to the curious Yankee, Southern writers have certainly done little to reflect and promote their region's progress.
Faulkner culminates the Southern legend perhaps more masterfully than it has ever been, or could ever be, done.
The `` approximate '' is important, because even after the order of the work has been established by the chance method, the result is not inviolable.
But it has been during the last two centuries, during the scientific revolution, that our independence from the physical environment has made the most rapid strides.
In the life sciences, there has been an enormous increase in our understanding of disease, in the mechanisms of heredity, and in bio- and physiological chemistry.
Even in domains where detailed and predictive understanding is still lacking, but where some explanations are possible, as with lightning and weather and earthquakes, the appropriate kind of human action has been more adequately indicated.
The persistent horror of having a malformed child has, I believe, been reduced, not because we have gained any control over this misfortune, but precisely because we have learned that we have so little control over it.

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