Help


[permalink] [id link]
+
Page "fiction" ¶ 909
from Brown Corpus
Edit
Promote Demote Fragment Fix

Some Related Sentences

She and had
She had reached a point at which she didn't even care how she looked.
She stared at him, her eyes wide as she thought about what he had said ; ;
She had helped him change his mind.
She said, and her tone had softened until it was almost friendly.
She had picked up the quirt and was twirling it around her wrist and smiling at him.
She had offered to walk, but Pamela knew she would not feel comfortable about her child until she had personally confided her to the care of the little pink woman who chose to be called `` Auntie ''.
She seemed to have come such a long distance -- too far for her destination which had wilfully been swallowed up in the greedy gloom of the trees.
She had the feeling that, under the mouldering leaves, there would be the bodies of dead animals, quietly decaying and giving their soil back to the mountain.
She had to get away from here before this demoniac possession swallowed up the liquid of her eyes and sank into the fibers of her brain, depriving her of reason and sight.
She had been snared here by a vile sensuality that writhed around her throat in ever-tightening circles.
She had to escape.
She had to move in some direction -- any direction that would take her away from this evil place.
She wondered what had taken place in town, between him and his wife.
She had spent too many hours looking ahead, hoping and longing to catch even a glimpse of Dan and finding nothing but emptiness.
She had arrived this morning and come straight to the English Gardens.
She had retreated to this world.
She had touched her face, truly a noble and pure face, only with a lip salve which made her lips glisten but no redder than usual.
She had hated the whole idea before they started.
She had jumped away from his shy touch like a cat confronted by a sidewinder.
She had driven up with her husband in a convertible with Eastern license plates, although the two drivers knew nothing at the moment about that.
She might have been someone he had once loved.
She began to watch a blonde-haired man, also in shorts, standing right at the rear of the wrecked car in the one spot that most of the crowd had detoured slightly.
She was sitting on the edge of the bed again, back in the same position where the snake had found her.
She had the opportunity that few clever women can resist, of showing her superiority in argument over a man.

She and made
She just about made me carry her upstairs and then she clung to me and wouldn't let me go.
She stood up, smoothing her hair down, straightening her clothes, feeling a thankfulness for the enveloping darkness outside, and, above everything else, for the absence of the need to answer, to respond, to be aware even of Stowey coming in or going out, and yet, now that she was beginning to cook, she glimpsed a future without him, a future alone like this, and the pain made her head writhe, and in a moment she found it hard to wait for Lucretia to come with her guests.
She made him sad some days, and he was never sure why ; ;
She had talked to him right there, with the hot sun in his face, which made him sweat and feel ashamed.
She made General Burnside's horse's belly do so funny when it was upside down.
She had been moving in cafe society as Lady Diana Harrington, a name that made some of the gossip columns.
She teamed up with another beauty, whose name has been lost to history, and commenced with some fiddling that would have made Nero envious.
She spoke also with deep thankfulness of the many individuals and agencies whose interest and efforts through the years had made the work so fruitful in results.
She had reason to change the one she made right after Mr. Meeker's death.
She made a face at him and then she laughed.
She was thinking of Paul a few weeks ago, in the Easter holidays, with her at one of those awful Friday Evening Dancing Class parties her mother had made her attend.
She made better pictures than any book he'd read, but he didn't say so.
She made me welcome.
She felt, and said, that sympathy only made people feel sorry for themselves ; ;
The Irish were gay but made trouble in the house ; the English were of all kinds " She proposes this, after the fact, knowing the chosen Charlotte lasts decades.
She also has a habit of constantly changing her hairstyle, and in every appearance by her much is made of the clothes and hats she wears.
She has been made the heroine of a tragedy by François Ponsard, Agnès de Méranie, and of an opera by Vincenzo Bellini, La straniera.
She became a national figure in 1991 when she alleged that U. S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas had made harassing sexual statements when he was her supervisor at the U. S. Department of Education and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
She testified that after leaving the EEOC, she had had two " inconsequential " phone conversations with Thomas, and had seen him personally on two occasions ; once to get a job reference and the second time when he made a public appearance in Oklahoma where she was teaching.
She made sure that Abd ar-Rahman's education was conducted with some rigorousness.
She was beloved by two gods, Hermes and Apollo, and boasted that she was prettier than Artemis because she made two gods fall in love with her at once.
She made substantial contributions to the PBS documentary series Cosmos and was the third wife of the late Carl Sagan.
She finds favor in the king's eyes, and is made his new queen.

0.072 seconds.