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Page "romance" ¶ 327
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She and looked
She had reached a point at which she didn't even care how she looked.
She looked around.
She looked at him, lips compressed.
She looked more like twenty-five or six.
She set the dipper on the edge of the deck, leaving it for him to stretch after it while she looked on scornfully.
She looked down at her hands, too.
She looked up and saw that, without knowing it, Mrs. Coolidge was holding it aloft.
She looked at him in surprise.
She looked back toward the schoolroom.
She looked at the girl speculatively from eyes which had paled with the years ; ;
She felt the look and looked back because she could not help it, seeing that he was neither as old nor as thick as she had at first believed.
She looked mighty interested, though.
She looked at him impudently over the corner of the paper.
She it was who had looked to see if I was wearing shoes upon learning that I couldn't drive.
She looked confused at this, and I felt sure it had been a wrong response for me to make.
She must have looked temptingly pretty to the dean as he put the crown on her head.
She looked at me provocatively.
She looked around, self-consciously.
She certainly looked Japanese, and perhaps she could not really blame the young men.
She looked crestfallen, as if he had somehow disappointed the whole human race.
She looked well-fed and prosperous, but he didn't get the impression he was being propositioned the way he'd been hoping.
She looked as if she were accusing me of some fraud.
She looked about sixty, though I recalled that the chart gave her age as forty-four.
She looked good, with her short tousled hair and no make-up.

She and out
She said, `` I guess the Lord looks out for fools, drunkards, and innocents ''.
She swung the quirt again, and this time he caught her wrist and pulled her out of the saddle.
She locked the ignition, removed the keys, stepped out of the car and went into the house.
She was glad, completely and unselfishly glad, to see that things were working out the right way for both Sally and Dan.
She stood up, pulled the coat from her shoulders and started to slide it off, then let out a high-pitched scream and I let out a low-pitched, wobbling sound like a muffler blowing out.
She did not call out.
She knelt out of reverence for having read the Meditations of St. Augustine.
She entreated me to see a doctor, and when I refused, brought one out to see me.
She was ready to kill the beef, dress it out, and with vegetables from her garden was going to can soup, broth, hash, and stew against the winter.
She had taken him out of the schoolhouse and closed the school for the summer, after she saw Miss Snow crack Joel across the face with a ruler for letting a snake loose in the schoolroom.
She tried to find some way to draw him out, to help him.
She sought Kate out upstairs, her lips trembling.
She stood up, smoothing her hair down, straightening her clothes, feeling a thankfulness for the enveloping darkness outside, and, above everything else, for the absence of the need to answer, to respond, to be aware even of Stowey coming in or going out, and yet, now that she was beginning to cook, she glimpsed a future without him, a future alone like this, and the pain made her head writhe, and in a moment she found it hard to wait for Lucretia to come with her guests.
She was looking out at the garden.
She held out her hand to show that she had money.
She told police about the prospective tenant she had heard quarreling with her father some weeks before the murders, but she said she thought he was from out of town because she heard him mention something about talking to his partner.
She wasn't quite sure that I felt enough remorse about my drinking, or that I would not return to it once I was out and on my own again.
She could easily understand why the two men had been startled to find a strange girl in the back seat of their car ( she had figured that out ), but she couldn't understand their subsequent actions.
She had it all planned out, how she'd do.
She was listening to other voices, out of the future.
She opened it an inch and poked out the keys for me to give you.
She had swished away, she had been gone for a long time probably when Sarah suddenly realized that she ought to stop her, pour out the coffee, so no one would drink it.
She ate what she could and went out along the covered passageway, with the rain dripping from the vines.

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