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Norse and mythology
The conception that diseases and death come from invisible shots sent by supernatural beings, or magicians is common in Germanic and Norse mythology.
Category: Locations in Norse mythology
Alfheim (, " elf home ") is one of the Nine Worlds and home of the Light Elves in Norse mythology and appears also in Anglo-Scottish ballads under the form Elfhame ( Elphame, Elfame ) as a fairyland, sometimes modernized as Elfland ( Elfinland, Elvenland ).
Category: Locations in Norse mythology
In Norse mythology, Ask and Embla ( from Old Norse Askr ok Embla )— male and female respectively — were the first two humans, created by the gods.
Ægir ( Old Norse " sea ") is a sea giant, god of the ocean and king of the sea creatures in Norse mythology.
* Norse mythology
The word aegis is identified with protection by a strong force with its roots in Greek mythology and adopted by the Romans ; there are parallels in Norse mythology and in Egyptian mythology as well, where the Greek word aegis is applied by extension.
In Norse mythology, the dragon Fafnir ( best known in the form of a dragon slain by Sigurðr ) bears on his forehead the Ægis-helm ( ON ægishjálmr ), or Ægir's helmet, or more specifically the " Helm of Terror ".
In Norse mythology, Bifröst ( or sometimes Bilröst ) is a burning rainbow bridge that reaches between Midgard ( the world ) and Asgard, the realm of the gods.
Scholars have proposed that the bridge may have originally represented the Milky Way and have noted parallels between the bridge and another bridge in Norse mythology, Gjallarbrú.
Baldr ( also Balder, Baldur ) is a god in Norse mythology.
In Norse mythology, Breiðablik ( Broad-gleaming ) is the home of Baldr.
Category: Locations in Norse mythology
Bilskirnir ( Old Norse " lightning-crack ") is the hall of the god Thor in Norse mythology.
Category: Locations in Norse mythology
In Norse mythology, Brísingamen ( from Old Norse brisinga " flaming, glowing " and men " jewellery, ornament ") is the necklace of the goddess Freyja.
Category: Artifacts in Norse mythology
Bragi is the skaldic god of poetry in Norse mythology.

Norse and Freyja
Stemming from Old Norse Freyja, modern forms of the name include Freya, Freja, Freyia, Frøya, Frejya and Freia, Frejya.
Examples of goddesses attested in Norse mythology include Frigg ( wife of Odin, and the Anglo-Saxon version of whom is namesake of the modern English weekday Friday ), Skaði ( one time wife of Njörðr ), Njerda ( Scandinavian name of Nerthus ), that also was married to Njörðr during Bronze Age, Freyja ( wife of Óðr ), Sif ( wife of Thor ), Gerðr ( wife of Freyr ), and personifications such as Jörð ( earth ), Sól ( the sun ), and Nótt ( night ).
In Norse mythology there are themes of brother-sister marriage, a prominent example being between Njörðr and his unnamed sister ( perhaps Nerthus ), parents of Freyja and Freyr.
He called the element vanadium after Old Norse Vanadís ( another name for the Norse Vanr goddess Freyja, whose facets include connections to beauty and fertility ), because of the many beautifully colored chemical compounds it produces.
A second clan of gods, the Vanir, is also mentioned in Norse mythology: the god Njord and his children, Freyr and Freyja, are the most prominent Vanir gods who join the Æsir as hostages after a war between Æsir and Vanir.
* Freyja, also known as Hörn, a Norse goddess of love, beauty, fertility, war and death
The settlers of Iceland were dominantly pagans and worshipped the Norse gods, among them Odin, Thor, Freyr and Freyja.
* Brisingamen — a necklace belonging to the Norse goddess Freyja.
In Norse mythology, Fólkvangr (" field of the host " or " people-field " or " army-field ") is a meadow or field ruled over by the goddess Freyja where half of those that die in combat go upon death, while the other half go to the god Odin in Valhalla.
In Norse mythology, Sessrúmnir ( Old Norse " seat-room " or " seat-roomer ") is both the goddess Freyja's hall located in Fólkvangr, a field where Freyja receives half of those who die in battle, and also the name of a ship.
* Freyja, the Norse goddess
Although Frøya is a variant of the name of the Norse goddess Freyja, the Old Norse form of the name of the island was Frøy or Frey ( the ending-a in the modern form is actually the definite article-so the meaning of Frøya is ' the Frøy ').
Therefore the name of the island probably has the same root as the name of the Norse god Freyr, brother to Freyja.
The dialog between the wolf and Little Red Riding Hood has its analogies to the Norse Þrymskviða from the Elder Edda ; the giant Þrymr had stolen Mjölner, Thor's hammer, and demanded Freyja as his bride for its return.
Dís also had the meaning " lady " in Old Norse poetry as in the case of Freyja whose name itself means " lady " ( frawjō ) and who is called Vanadís (" lady of the vanir ").
In Norse mythology, Óðr ( Old Norse for " mad, frantic, furious, vehement, eager ", as a noun " mind, feeling " and also " song, poetry "; Orchard ( 1997 ) gives " the frenzied one ") or Óð, sometimes angliziced as Odr or Od, is a figure associated with the major goddess Freyja.
The name appears in a kenning for the major goddess Freyja ; " Óð's girl " ( Old Norse Óðs mey gefna ), pointing to a relation with the goddess.

Norse and Old
In Norse religion, Asgard ( Old Norse: Ásgarðr ; meaning " Enclosure of the Æsir ") is one of the Nine Worlds and is the country or capital city of the Norse Gods surrounded by an incomplete wall attributed to a Hrimthurs riding the stallion Svaðilfari, according to Gylfaginning.
One of them, Múnón, married Priam's daughter, Tróán, and had by her a son, Trór, to be pronounced Thor in Old Norse.
According to The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Asgard is derived from Old Norse āss, god + garðr, enclosure ; from Indo-European roots ansu-spirit, demon ( see cognate ahura ) + gher-grasp, enclose ( see cognates garden and yard ).< ref >; See also ansu-and gher -< sup > 1 </ sup > in " Appendix I: Indo-European Roots " in the same work .</ ref >
Álfheim as an abode of the Elves is mentioned only twice in Old Norse texts.
* Gylfaginning in Old Norse
Old Norse askr literally means " ash tree " but the etymology of embla is uncertain, and two possibilities of the meaning of embla are generally proposed.
( from Icelandic for " Æsir faith ", pronounced, in Old Norse ) is a form of Germanic neopaganism which developed in the United States from the 1970s.
is an Icelandic ( and equivalently Old Norse ) term consisting of two parts.
The term is the Old Norse / Icelandic translation of, a neologism coined in the context of 19th century romantic nationalism, used by Edvard Grieg in his 1870 opera Olaf Trygvason.
( plural ), the term used to identify those who practice Ásatrú is a compound with ( Old Norse ) " man ".
A Goði or Gothi ( plural goðar ) is the historical Old Norse term for a priest and chieftain in Norse paganism.
Ægir is an Old Norse word meaning " terror " and the name of a destructive giant associated with the sea ; ægis is the genitive ( possessive ) form of ægir and has no direct relation to Greek aigis.
The exact derivation is unclear, with the Old English fiæll or feallan and the Old Norse fall all being possible candidates.
Bornholm (; Old Norse: Burgundaholmr, " the island of the Burgundians ") is a Danish island in the Baltic Sea located to the east of ( most of ) the rest of Denmark, south of Sweden, and north of Poland.
This would have been a burial fitting a king who was famous for his wealth in Old Norse sources.
The first known use of the word ball in English in the sense of a globular body that is played with was in 1205 in in the phrase, "" The word came from the Middle English bal ( inflected as ball-e ,-es, in turn from Old Norse böllr ( pronounced ; compare Old Swedish baller, and Swedish boll ) from Proto-Germanic ballu-z, ( whence probably Middle High German bal, ball-es, Middle Dutch bal ), a cognate with Old High German ballo, pallo, Middle High German balle from Proto-Germanic * ballon ( weak masculine ), and Old High German ballâ, pallâ, Middle High German balle, Proto-Germanic * ballôn ( weak feminine ).

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